PMP Interview Questions and Answers Set 3

21. How do you encourage your employees and ensure proper growth and development?

By mentoring, coaching and providing feedback about their overall work on a daily basis. I value growth and creativity which is why I ensure the team members stay motivated by reminding them of their strengths and help them get better at handling/overcoming their weaknesses.

22. What are your current work plans? Why are you thinking about leaving your present job?

Leaving a current job makes sure doesn’t affect on professionalism and ethics.

23. Describe an ideal job for you?

There is no ideal job in the world, we have to face challenges and changes, and a project is always subjectable to risks and changes. We have to accept the fact life is not a bed of roses. Trick question.

24. What would you do if you found out that a contractor was in a conflict of interest situation?

Terminate/Penalise the Contractor according to the agreed contract terms.

25.Give me an example of a win-win situation you have negotiated?

Understand that win-win situation means both side wins and do not have any compromise. Talk about customer ‘s requirements negotiation through a change control system, its a win-win situation.

26. Describe how those contributions impacted results?

Mention about the improvements through better Scope control, Time, Cost control.

27.What strengths did you bring to your last position?

The strengths of a Project Manager – Problem Solving, Communicator, Pro-active, Motivating for team members, a big picture person with an eye for details, integrity person, constant monitoring.

28.What Methods Will You Use to Deliver the Results We’re Looking For?

When answering this question, it’s good to highlight techniques that you’ve used successfully in the past and identify the tools and support you expect your employer to provide. However, it’s also important to show that you understand the challenges inherent to that particular company and project. The interviewer may be looking to see if you’ll take a one-size-fits-all approach to your project manager duties, or if you’ve given some thought to the demands of a particular job.

Because of this, a generic answer is likely to fall short. Most interviewers don’t want to hear that a prospective project manager will apply the same framework to every problem; they want to know that the person they hire will take the unique nature of each project into account. To give a well-considered answer, it’s a good idea to respond to some questions of your own. For example, find out who your project sponsor will be, what support you’ll receive from the various departments involved in the project and what recourse you’ll have if shifting priorities impact resource allocation.

This means that you’ll have to do some quick thinking on your feet to process the interviewer’s answers and address how they will impact your approach to the project. The key is to demonstrate that you’ll ask the right questions at the outset rather than make broad statements that suggest you would take the same approach to any project manager job.

29. Explain Peter Principle with an example?

According to the Peter Principle, an employee raises his/her incompetency with time. Let us say, an employee is a good performer. His performance has been increasing consistently and noticing this, the boss decides to promote the employee. However, the performance doesn’t continue to increase after promotion. The reason behind this is that the employee might have reached his level of incompetence.

30. How Will You Put Together Your Project Team?

In asking a question like this, interviewers are really trying to find out what kind of a leader you are. They want to know if you understand the diverse skills and competencies that are required to bring a project to completion. Will you seek out people just like yourself, or are you prepared to work with many different personalities? Can you inspire and motivate everyone from senior executives to hourly support staff? Your answer should show that you recognize it takes many individual contributors with different strengths and capabilities to complete a project. A successful project manager doesn’t have to be good at everything; he or she just needs to know how to assemble and manage a team with expertise in a wide variety of areas.